Comfort Keepers

Comfort Keepers – Elevating the Human Spirit

Posted by  //  February 18, 2019  //  Local Business

1301 Trumansburg Rd. Ste. A, Ithaca, NY
607-272-0444 • 607-423-7390

Consumer research illuminated the principle that seniors desire in their lives the same things that we all do – connectedness, love, purpose, hope and joy. This doesn’t change from what we wanted throughout our younger years. It’s fundamental to how we define quality of life, going beyond keeping them safe and secure at home.

Talking about Love vs. Fear

Every decision in life is motivated by one of two emotions. At the most basic level, it boils down to love and fear. When it comes to senior care, that’s an extremely emotional decision. People are motivated by love or fear for that too, and unfortunately the industry, tends to lean toward worry, or fear. Make sure you keep them safe and secure so nothing bad happens.

No wonder families can take over a year before they decide on home care for their loved ones! There are all kinds of emotional barriers that need to come down first… so what if we helped them along? Comfort Keepers is going to change the conversation about caring for our seniors. We are going to be talking about love… not fear.

New Brand Promise

Comfort Keepers elevates the human spirit for today’s seniors and their families through a unique, individualized approach to care that helps seniors thrive and achieve greater wellbeing by fostering everyday positive moments, connection and a more purposeful life no matter their age or acuity.

Our Comfort Keepers brand promise is that we elevate the human spirit for today’s seniors and their families. We know that people want the same things no matter how old they are – connectedness, love, purpose, hope and joy. Everyone is so focused on safety and security but what both seniors and their families want even more is how to help them thrive and live their lives – regardless of physical condition or mental state. That’s why Comfort Keepers is all about Elevating the Human Spirit.

We help our clients reclaim all that life has to offer and focus on daily doses of joy that can make all the difference. We employ Interactive Caregiving as well as technology and other services that help our clients connect with themselves, with others and with the outside world, helping them thrive both mentally and physically no matter their level of acuity.

  • Our approach to caring for our elders is rooted in science and medicine

  • Seniors who feel better can live healthier and longer.

  • Social isolation and loneliness is health equivalent of 15 cigarettes

  • Volunteering = lower depression, higher wellbeing

  • Elderly people who feel younger than their age show less brain aging, better memory and less depression

  • Socially isolated seniors have a much greater risk of mental and physical decline

  • Lower depression = less falls

  • Socialization and interaction slow Alzheimer’s and Dementia patients’ decline

  • Social isolation and loneliness is health equivalent of 15 cigs/day (AARP.org)

  • As little as 2 hours per week of volunteering is associated with a lower risk of depression and a higher feeling of well-being (Psychology Today)

  • Elderly people who feel younger than their age show less brain aging, better memory and less depression (thirdage.com)

  • Social engaged seniors have higher levels of physical, mental, and cognitive functioning (Stanford Center on Longevity)

  • Socially isolated seniors have a 59 percent greater risk of mental and physical decline than those who do not experience social isolation. (Forbes)

  • There is a correlation between depression in seniors and the number of falls that a senior may experience.

  • Socialization and interaction slow Alzheimer’s and Dementia patients’ decline. A study analyzing the correlation between loneliness and risk of developing AD revealed that lonely persons had higher risk of AD compared with persons who were not lonely. On the other hand, it has been reported that we can prevent cognitive decline and delay the onset of AD if we keep mentally active and frequently participate in social activities. (NIH.gov)

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