Lost Dogs of the Finger Lakes

Lost Dogs of the Finger Lakes

Posted by  //  August 17, 2016  //  Articles

Our mission at Lost Dogs of the Finger Lakes is to help the lost become found. Recently, I spoke with a wonderful woman who had found a dog. We posted the dog on our page and while the owner was found and positively identified in a matter of a few hours, it was not before the finder received a handful of calls from other people professing to be the dog’s owner. One caller even claimed to be the neighbor of the owner but when questioned, couldn’t give simple identifying information.

But there are lessons here, and ones that we need your help in sharing far and wide. People with bad intentions for our beloved pets are watching our page and others like it. They also ride the roads looking for pets that aren’t secured or being monitored. They are attempting to steal dogs or claim dogs that are not theirs and the reasons why are all bad; dog fighting, selling to labs for testing, adding to their hoarding collection, flipping…it’s an endless and terrifying list.

What can you, as the finder or owner, do? First and most importantly (as we’ve always preached) call your local Dog Control Officer (DCO) and file a lost or found report. Calling your DCO is not optional – it is a legal requirement. This report helps you and helps your dog. It creates a legal paper trail that will help to identify your dog when found or will help to prosecute someone who may have found your dog….and kept them.

Second, this is for you the finder, when an individual calls or arrives to claim ownership, insist on proof. Ask for vet records, licensing documentation, or even photos. If the individual claiming ownership cannot show proof, call your local police department or DCO right away and let them sort it out.

Third, and this is for you the owner, make sure your dog is licensed and wearing their tags. This registration is required by law and serves as proof of ownership and is a vital link to getting your dog safely home should they ever become lost.

What can we, as a community, do? We can educate about the role of our DCOs and the importance of licensing. We can make sure that we’re aware of the dangers out there for these dogs and protect them with everything we do. Thank you to all who share our posts…you’ve saved countless lives.

Leave a Comment

comm comm comm